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Appetite. 2008 Nov;51(3):468-73. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2008.01.013. Epub 2008 May 13.

Parent food purchases as a measure of exposure and preschool-aged children's willingness to identify and taste fruit and vegetables.

Author information

1
Washtenaw County Health and Human Services, 555 Towner, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, USA. busickd@ewashtenaw.org

Abstract

This study explored whether parents who purchase more fruit/vegetables have preschool-aged children who are able to identify fruit/vegetables and in turn are more likely to consume them. Sixty-two parent-child pairs were recruited during a 4-month period. The data collection included a child interview, a parent/guardian interview, a fruit/vegetable taste test for children, and a month-long food-receipt collection by the parent/guardian. As the percentage of fruit/vegetables purchased by parent increased, the child was more likely to accept all of the fruit/vegetables offered to him/her. A weak correlation was found between the child's ability to name fruit/vegetables and their willingness to try the fruit/vegetables offered. A trend was established between the child's ability to name the 10 fruits/vegetables and parent fruit/vegetable purchases. Parents who purchased the most fruit/vegetables, causing increased exposure, had children who were more willing to taste the fruit/vegetables offered to them.

PMID:
18573567
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2008.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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