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Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2008 Jul;56(3):334-56. doi: 10.1080/00207140802042007.

Hypnotizability as a potential risk factor for posttraumatic stress: a review of quantitative studies.

Author information

1
Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. samyard@u.washington.edu

Abstract

The authors review the literature relating hypnotizability and posttraumatic stress. Sixty-seven abstracts containing the key terms ASD, acute stress, trauma, traumatic, or PTSD in combination with either hypnotic susceptibility or hypnotizability were reviewed. Six articles were found containing data on hypnotizability and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Each of the studies showed some relation between hypnotizability and posttraumatic stress, but, in all of them, hypnotizability was measured after the potentially traumatizing event. High hypnotizability might be a risk factor for both acute and chronic posttraumatic symptoms. However, this cannot be determined until prospective studies measure hypnotizability in individuals before and after a potentially traumatizing event, perhaps by targeting populations that are at risk for experiencing trauma.

PMID:
18569143
DOI:
10.1080/00207140802042007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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