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Peptides. 2008 Sep;29(9):1603-8. doi: 10.1016/j.peptides.2008.05.003. Epub 2008 May 14.

Impacts of peripheral obestatin on colonic motility and secretion in conscious fed rats.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. chency@vghtpe.gov.tw

Abstract

Obestatin, a novel putative 23-amino acid peptide, was found to be derived from a mammalian preproghrelin gene by using a bioinformatics approach. Although the effects of obestatin on food intake and upper gut motility remain controversial, no studies have been carried out to explore its influence on lower gut motility and secretion. We investigated the impacts of intravenous (IV) injection of obestatin on rat colonic motor and secretory functions. Colonic transit time, fecal pellet output, and fecal content were measured in freely fed, conscious rats, which were chronically implanted with IV and colonic catheters. To test the validity of this animal model, human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) served as a stimulatory inducer of colonic motility and secretion. IV injection of obestatin (45, 100, and 300 nmol/kg) did not affect the colonic transit time, whereas IV injection of h/rCRF (30 nmol/kg) effectively accelerated colonic transit time. IV obestatin, in every dose we tested, also did not modify fecal pellet output, frequency of watery diarrhea, total fecal weight, fecal dried solid weight, or fecal fluid weight in the first hour after injection. On the other hand, IV injection of h/rCRF significantly enhanced fecal pellet output, as well as increased the frequency of watery diarrhea, total fecal weight, fecal dried solid weight, and fecal fluid weight during the first hour after injection compared with IV saline controls. In conclusion, peripheral obestatin administration has no impact on colonic motility and secretion in conscious fed rats.

PMID:
18565623
DOI:
10.1016/j.peptides.2008.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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