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Gastrointest Endosc. 2008 Sep;68(3):455-60. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2008.02.052. Epub 2008 Jun 17.

Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage in patients with acute cholecystitis in whom percutaneous transhepatic approach is contraindicated or anatomically impossible (with video).

Author information

1
Current affiliations: Department Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In patients with acute cholecystitis and at high risk for surgery, decompression of the gallbladder by percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) or aspiration (PTGBA) is needed as salvage therapy. However, we sometimes encounter patients in whom puncture cannot be performed for several reasons. Recently, endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage (ETGD) has been reported to be safe and effective for acute cholecystitis.

OBJECTIVE:

Our purpose was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of ETGD for acute cholecystitis in which a percutaneous transhepatic approach is contraindicated or anatomically impossible.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case study.

SETTING:

This procedure was performed in Tokyo Medical University Hospital.

PATIENTS:

Forty-three patients with acute cholecystitis, including 32 patients taking anticoagulation or antiplatelet drugs, 4 cases of Chilaiditi syndrome, 2 each of acute leukemia, marked ascites, and anatomic abnormality, and 1 case of hemophilia A.

INTERVENTION:

All patients underwent ETGD. A 5F nasobiliary-drainage catheter was placed into the gallbladder. In case of failed ETGD, PTGBD or PTGBA was performed subsequently.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT:

Efficacy and safety of this technique.

RESULTS:

ETGD was achieved in 36 patients (84%) without any serious procedure-related complications. A clinically favorable response for ETGD was seen in 35 patients (97%). In 7 patients in whom ETGD was unsuccessful and 1 patient in which it was ineffective, a percutaneous transhepatic approach was performed with severe hemorrhage biloma in the former and uncontrolled hemorrhage cholecystitis, leading to death in the latter.

LIMITATIONS:

Difficulty of maneuvering the guidewire and drainage tube into the gallbladder.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although comparative studies are needed to define the appropriate role of ETGD and percutaneous transhepatic approach, ETGD can be useful in patients with acute cholecystitis in which a percutaneous transhepatic approach is contraindicated or anatomically impossible.

PMID:
18561927
DOI:
10.1016/j.gie.2008.02.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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