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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Sep;93(9):3403-10. doi: 10.1210/jc.2008-0054. Epub 2008 Jun 17.

Inverse association of testosterone and the metabolic syndrome in men is consistent across race and ethnic groups.

Author information

1
New England Research Institutes, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472, USA. vkupelian@neriscience

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Low sex hormone levels have been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS).

OBJECTIVES:

Our objective was to determine whether the association between sex hormone levels and MetS varies by race/ethnicity among men and to investigate the relationship of sex hormones and individual components of MetS.

DESIGN:

We conducted a population-based observational survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

A multistage stratified design was used to recruit a random sample of 2301 racially/ethnically diverse men age 30-79 yr. Blood samples were obtained on 1899 men. Analyses were conducted on 1885 men with complete data on total testosterone (T), free T, and SHBG.

INTERVENTIONS:

There were no interventions.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

MetS was defined using a modification of the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. The association between MetS and sex hormone levels was assessed using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals estimated using logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

A strong inverse association was observed, in both bivariate and multivariate analyses, between hormone levels and MetS. The odds of MetS increased about two-fold with a 1 sd decrease in hormone levels. The association between sex hormones and MetS was statistically significant across racial/ethnic groups. Although the magnitude of this association was largest among White men, racial/ethnic differences were not statistically significant. The strength of the association of sex hormones with individual components of MetS varied; stronger associations were observed with waist circumference and dyslipidemia and more modest associations with diabetes and elevated blood sugar.

CONCLUSIONS:

A robust, dose-response relationship between sex hormone levels and odds of the metabolic syndrome in men is consistent across racial/ethnic groups.

PMID:
18559915
PMCID:
PMC2567862
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2008-0054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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