Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2008 Jun;6(6):569-75. doi: 10.3736/jcim20080605.

[Red peony root decoction in treatment of severe acute pancreatitis: a randomized controlled trial].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the therapeutic effects of red peony root decoction, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, and rhubarb in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).

METHODS:

A total of 96 consecutive patients with objectively-graded SAP were randomly divided into treatment and control groups. There were 48 cases in each group. The patients in the treatment and control groups were assigned to receive red peony root decoction and rhubarb treatment 1-2 times a day via a gastric tube respectively. Comparisons in the time needed for the disappearance of abdominal tenderness, fever and abdominal distension were made between the two groups. The total days of using antibiotics, enzyme inhibitor, protease inhibitor, and nasojejunal feeding start, nasojejunal feeding, gastrointestinal decompression, fasting diet were also compared. And comparison also included hospital stays and hospitalization costs.

RESULTS:

The durations of abdominal tenderness, fever and abdominal distension in the treatment group were less than those in the control group (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the time length for antibiotics (including anti-bacteria drug and antifungal agent) use, nasojejunal feeding start, nasojejunal feeding, gastrointestinal decompression, fasting diet, hospital stays and hospitalization costs were decreased in the treatment group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in enzyme inhibitor and protease inhibitor requirement, mortality and adverse reactions.

CONCLUSION:

Red peony root decoction is more effective than rhubarb alone for SAP patients.

PMID:
18559232
DOI:
10.3736/jcim20080605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center