Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Urol. 2008 Aug;180(2):715-7. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2008.04.043. Epub 2008 Jun 13.

Posterior urethral valves are often associated with cryptorchidism and inguinal hernias.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hyvinkää Hospital, Hyvinkää, Finland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We evaluated the incidence of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernias in patients with posterior urethral valves, and compared characteristics in patients with and without cryptorchidism or inguinal hernia.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 200 patients with posterior urethral valves treated between 1953 and 2003 were identified from a hospital database. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed. The state of testicular descent and the presence of inguinal hernias were recorded in 192 patients. Patient characteristics were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Of 192 patients 31 (16%) had cryptorchidism, which was bilateral in 9 (29%). A total of 21 patients (11%) had inguinal hernias that were not associated with cryptorchid testes. The patients with cryptorchidism, and to some extent the patients with hernias, appeared to have a more severe form of posterior urethral valves than those without cryptorchidism. At the time of diagnosis the median serum creatinine concentration was 100 mumol/l (range 38 to 460) in boys with cryptorchidism and 87 (14 to 593) in boys without cryptorchidism (p = 0.131). At 6-month followup the median serum creatinine levels were 90 mumol/l (range 31 to 573) in patients with cryptorchidism and 45 (19 to 504) in patients without cryptorchidism (p = 0.006). Cryptorchidism was also more common in cases diagnosed neonatally compared to those diagnosed at a later age (14 of 52 patients, 27% vs 14 of 112, 12.5%, respectively, p = 0.027).

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernias requiring surgery is high in patients with posterior urethral valves. Patients with cryptorchidism appear to have a more severe form of posterior urethral valves than those with normal testes.

PMID:
18554641
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2008.04.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center