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Neuropsychobiology. 2008;57(3):131-8. doi: 10.1159/000138916. Epub 2008 Jun 13.

No evidence of an association between norepinephrine transporter gene polymorphisms and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a family-based and case-control association study in a Korean sample.

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1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Neurobiological and pharmacological research has suggested that dysregulation of the central noradrenergic systems might be involved in the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Previous studies have demonstrated that the norepinephrine transporter gene (SLC6A2) is associated with ADHD. The aims of this study were to examine the association of the SLC6A2 G1287A and -3081(A/T) polymorphisms with ADHD in Korean children and adolescents, and to determine the relationships of the genotypes of these two polymorphisms with continuous performance test results and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory profiles of ADHD. In a case-control study, we assessed 186 ADHD probands and 150 normal controls; 109 trios were studied in a family-based association analysis. There were no significant differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of the SLC6A2 G1287A and -3081(A/T) polymorphisms between the ADHD and control groups (p > 0.05). In the transmission disequilibrium test analyses, there was no evidence for biased transmission of any of the alleles of the SLC6A2 G1287A and -3081(A/T) polymorphisms. In the haplotype analyses of these two polymorphisms, the global and individual chi(2) tests showed no significant associations between any of the haplotypes and ADHD. There were no significant differences with respect to the continuous performance test results and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory profiles in the ADHD probands according to the genotypes of the SLC6A2 G1287A and -3081(A/T) polymorphisms. Our findings do not support SLC6A2 as a major genetic susceptibility factor in ADHD.

PMID:
18552510
DOI:
10.1159/000138916
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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