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Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 16;101(12A):34F-40F. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.04.017.

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and risk of stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. pgorelic@uic.edu

Abstract

Stroke is the second-leading cause of death worldwide and is a disabling disease of both older and younger adults. Stroke is also among the most highly preventable disorders because there are well-defined risk factors and preventatives. The establishment of new risk markers or factors for stroke risk assessment provides a new avenue for stroke prevention. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes oxidized phospholipids, releasing lysophosphatidylcholine, which has proinflammatory properties thought to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture. In 2005, the Lp-PLA(2) blood test was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for assessing the risk of ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease. In epidemiologic studies, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipid factors have not been shown to be consistent predictors of stroke risk. Lp-PLA(2) measures, on the other hand, have shown a consistent association with stroke risk, conferring about a 2-fold increase in stroke occurrence. This relation has been studied in both first and recurrent stroke and is reviewed in this article. Importantly, a recent study has now shown that Lp-PLA(2) may increase the area under the curve beyond that of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and C-reactive protein. Therefore, Lp-PLA(2) determination may provide a pivotal opportunity to appropriately classify previously misclassified persons who are actually at high risk of stroke and in need of aggressive stroke intervention.

PMID:
18549870
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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