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Nutrition. 2008 Oct;24(10):925-32. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2008.04.002. Epub 2008 Jun 10.

Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, is related to lower body mass index and waist circumference in free-living humans [corrected].

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1
Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Erratum in

  • Nutrition. 2009 Nov-Dec;25(11-12):1136.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Experimental trials using test meals suggest that water promotes satiety and decreases subsequent intake, thus possibly working to prevent obesity, when it is consumed as an integral component of a food, but not when consumed alone or alongside a food. We examined the associations of intake of water from beverages and intake of water from foods with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets.

METHODS:

This observational cross-sectional study included 1136 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated, self-administered, comprehensive, diet-history questionnaire. BMI was calculated using measured body height and weight. Waist circumference was measured at the level of the umbilicus.

RESULTS:

Means +/- standard deviations of BMI, waist circumference, intake of water from beverages, and intake of water from foods were 21.3 +/- 2.7 kg/m(2), 72.9 +/- 7.1 cm, 569 +/- 318 g/1000 kcal, and 476 +/- 110 g/1000 kcal, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, intake of water from beverages was not associated with BMI (P for trend = 0.25) or waist circumference (P for trend = 0.43). Conversely, intake of water from foods showed independent and negative associations with BMI (P for trend = 0.030) and waist circumference (P for trend = 0.0003).

CONCLUSION:

Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, was independently associated with lower BMI and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets.

PMID:
18547786
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2008.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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