Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Mar;31(3):398-408. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.05.010. Epub 2008 Jun 10.

Deregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Abstract

Abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been previously reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To extend these findings, several sphingolipids and sphingolipid hydrolases were analyzed in brain samples from AD patients and age-matched normal individuals. We found a pattern of elevated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and acid ceramidase (AC) expression in AD, leading to a reduction in sphingomyelin and elevation of ceramide. More sphingosine also was found in the AD brains, although sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels were reduced. Notably, significant correlations were observed between the brain ASM and S1P levels and the levels of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Based on these findings, neuronal cell cultures were treated with Abeta oligomers, which were found to activate ASM, increase ceramide, and induce apoptosis. Pre-treatment of the neurons with purified, recombinant AC prevented the cells from undergoing Abeta-induced apoptosis. We propose that ASM activation is an important pathological event leading to AD, perhaps due to Abeta deposition. The downstream consequences of ASM activation are elevated ceramide, activation of ceramidases, and production of sphingosine. The reduced levels of S1P in the AD brain, together with elevated ceramide, likely contribute to the disease pathogenesis.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center