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J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Jul;22(4):1087-93. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816d4542.

Determination of urine steroid profile in untrained men to evaluate recovery after a strength training session.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Sport Science Faculty, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain. rtimon@unex.es

Abstract

Intense physical exercise is an important modifier of hormone metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variations in the urine profile of glucuroconjugated steroids (androgens, estrogens, and corticosteroids) as a consequence of a session of strength exercises. The subjects were a group (N = 20) of untrained male university students. They performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions, with a 3-minute recovery time between sets, at 70-75% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Four urine samples were collected per subject: before the session, immediately after, 3 hours after, and 48 hours after the session. They were assayed using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. The concentrations of the different hormones were determined according to the urine creatinine level (ng steroid per mg creatinine). The substances assayed were testosterone, epitestosterone (Epit), androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androsterone, etiocholanolone, beta-estradiol, estrone, tetrahydrocortisone (THE), and tetrahydrocortisol (THF). The results showed a significant decline after exercise with respect to the rested state in the urinary excretion of testosterone, Epit, DHEA, androsterone, and etiocholanolone. At 48 hours, there was a significant increase in the urinary excretion of Epit, androstenedione, androsterone, etiocholanolone, estrone, and THE. The androsterone + etiocholanolone/THE + THF ratio decreased after exercise, increased significantly (p < 0.05) at 3 hours, and returned to near resting levels at 48 hours. The data suggest that the performing a strength session at 70-75% of maximum strength provoked a state of fatigue in the subjects, from which they recovered 48 hours after the exercise.

PMID:
18545203
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816d4542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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