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Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2008 Jun;17 Suppl 1:S74-7. doi: 10.1002/mpr.253.

Differences in help seeking rates after brief intervention for alcohol use disorders in general practice patients with and without comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders.

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1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Research Group S:TEP (Substance Abuse: Treatment, Epidemiology and Prevention), University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. Janina.Grothues@psychiatric.uk.sh.de

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine, if the utilization of help for problematic drinking after brief intervention (BI) differs between general practice (GP) patients with and without comorbid depression or anxiety disorders.

METHODS:

Longitudinal data of 374 GP patients, who met the diagnostic criteria of alcohol dependence or abuse according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) and criteria of at-risk drinking or binge drinking, were drawn from a randomized controlled BI study. Participants were randomly allocated to either a control or one of two intervention groups, receiving a series of alcohol related BI. Of the sample, 88 participants were diagnosed with comorbid anxiety and/or depressive disorders. At 12-months follow-up, differences in utilization of formal help for drinking problems were assessed between comorbid and non-comorbid individuals.

RESULTS:

BI were significantly related to an increase in utilization of formal help in non-comorbid patients (chi(2 )= 4.54; df = 1; p < 0.05) but not in comorbid individuals (chi(2 )= 0.40; df = 1; p = 0.60). In a logistic regression analysis, comorbidity [odds ratio (OR) = 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-2.88; p = 0.01) and previous help seeking (OR = 15.98; CI = 6.10-41.85; p < 0.001) were found to be positive predictors for utilization of formal help.

CONCLUSION:

BIs do not seem to significantly support help-seeking in the comorbid. As comorbid anxiety and depression constitute a positive predictor for help-seeking, individuals with problematic drinking and comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders might benefit from more specialized support exceeding the low level of BI.

PMID:
18543367
DOI:
10.1002/mpr.253
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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