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Am J Pathol. 1991 Jul;139(1):29-35.

Macrophage-tropic variants of SIV are associated with specific AIDS-related lesions but are not essential for the development of AIDS.

Author information

1
Division of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, New England Regional Primate Research Center, Southborough, Massachusetts 01772.

Abstract

The importance of macrophage infection for the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was investigated. Molecularly cloned simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 replicates very poorly in cultured macrophages yet it causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys. Three of five rhesus monkeys that died with AIDS following SIVmac239 infection showed no disease manifestations directly associated with macrophage infection, such as encephalitis and granulomatous interstitial pneumonia. Simian immunodeficiency virus recovered from the peripheral blood of these three animals at or near the time of death replicated very poorly if at all in cultured macrophages, and tissues taken at autopsy showed little or no infection of macrophages by immunohistochemical staining. However two of the five rhesus monkeys that died with AIDS following SIVmac239 infection displayed a characteristic SIV-related meningoencephalitis and/or granulomatous pneumonia, lesions associated with macrophage infection. Simian immunodeficiency virus recovered from the peripheral blood of these two animals near the time of death replicated extremely well in cultured macrophages, indicating the emergency of macrophage-tropic variants in vivo. Furthermore tissues taken at autopsy from these two showed many infected macrophages by immunohistochemical staining. These results indicate that AIDS and death can occur without obvious involvement of macrophage infection. However the presence of macrophage-tropic viral strains appears to influence the disease course and disease manifestations.

PMID:
1853937
PMCID:
PMC1886139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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