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BMC Pharmacol. 2008 Jun 6;8:9. doi: 10.1186/1471-2210-8-9.

Antagonist affinity measurements at the Gi-coupled human histamine H3 receptor expressed in CHO cells.

Author information

1
Institute of Cell Signalling, Medical School, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. jillian.baker@nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The H3 histamine receptor is a Gi-coupled GPCR that has been proven to exist in different agonist-induced states, including that defined by the protean agonist proxyfan. Several GPCRs are now known to exist in different states. For some of these, antagonist affinity measurement remain constant regardless of the state of the receptor, for others e.g. the beta-adrenoceptors, the antagonist affinity measurements vary considerably depending on which agonist-dependent state is being identified. The purpose of this study was to examine the antagonist affinity measurements at the Gi-coupling human H3 receptor, paying particular attention to measurements made in the presence of full agonists, partial agonists and the proxyfan protean agonist-induced state of the receptor.

RESULTS:

CHO cells stably expressing the human histamine H3 receptor and a CRE-SPAP reporter were used. Measurements of CRE-gene transcription and 3H-cAMP accumulation were made. A range of ligands of different agonist efficacies were determined, including some partial agonists e.g. VUF 5681. Unlike other Gi-coupled receptors, no Gs-coupled state of the receptor was detected with these ligands. Antagonist affinity measurements were constant, whether the measurements were made in the presence of a full agonist, a partial agonist or the protean agonist proxyfan.

CONCLUSION:

In contrast to all three subtypes of the beta-adrenoceptors, but in keeping with the traditional pharmacological dogma, antagonist affinity measurements remained constant at the human H3 receptor, including the medium-efficacy proxyfan-induced state of the receptor and the VUF5681-induced state of the receptor.

PMID:
18538007
PMCID:
PMC2430196
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2210-8-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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