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Psychol Med. 2009 Mar;39(3):413-23. doi: 10.1017/S0033291708003723. Epub 2008 Jun 4.

Associations of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 with cognitive symptoms of depression: 12-year follow-up of the Whitehall II study.

Author information

1
International Institute for Society and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCL Medical School, London, UK. d.gimeno@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A lack of longitudinal studies has made it difficult to establish the direction of associations between circulating concentrations of low-grade chronic inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, and cognitive symptoms of depression. The present study sought to assess whether C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 predict cognitive symptoms of depression or whether these symptoms predict inflammatory markers.

METHOD:

In a prospective occupational cohort study of British white-collar civil servants (the Whitehall II study), serum C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and cognitive symptoms of depression were measured at baseline in 1991-1993 and at follow-up in 2002-2004, an average follow-up of 11.8 years. Symptoms of depression were measured with four items describing cognitive symptoms of depression from the General Health Questionnaire. The number of participants varied between 3339 and 3070 (mean age 50 years, 30% women) depending on the analysis.

RESULTS:

Baseline C-reactive protein (beta=0.046, p=0.004) and interleukin-6 (beta=0.046, p=0.005) predicted cognitive symptoms of depression at follow-up, while baseline symptoms of depression did not predict inflammatory markers at follow-up. After full adjustment for sociodemographic, behavioural and biological risk factors, health conditions, medication use and baseline cognitive systems of depression, baseline C-reactive protein (beta=0.038, p=0.036) and interleukin-6 (beta=0.041, p=0.018) remained predictive of cognitive symptoms of depression at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that inflammation precedes depression at least with regard to the cognitive symptoms of depression.

PMID:
18533059
PMCID:
PMC2788760
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291708003723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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