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Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2008 Aug;295(2):R575-82. doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.90354.2008. Epub 2008 Jun 4.

High multivitamin intake by Wistar rats during pregnancy results in increased food intake and components of the metabolic syndrome in male offspring.

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1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 150 College St., Rm. 322, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2.

Abstract

The effect of high multivitamin intake during pregnancy on the metabolic phenotype of rat offspring was investigated. Pregnant Wistar rats (n=10 per group) were fed the AIN-93G diet with the recommended vitamin (RV) content or a 10-fold increase [high vitamin (HV) content]. In experiment 1, male and female offspring were followed for 12 wk after weaning; in experiment 2, only males were followed for 28 wk. Body weight (BW) was measured weekly. Every 4 wk, after an overnight fast, food intake over 1 h was measured 30 min after a gavage of glucose or water. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed every 3-5 wk. Postweaning fasting glucose, insulin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1, and systolic blood pressure were measured. No difference in BW at birth or litter size was observed. Food intake was greater in males born to HV dams (P<0.05), and at 28 wk after weaning, BW was 8% higher (P<0.05) and fat pad mass was 27% higher (P<0.05). Food intake reduction after the glucose preload was nearly twofold less in males born to HV dams at 12 wk after weaning (P<0.05). Fasting glucose, insulin, and ghrelin were 11%, 62%, and 41% higher in males from HV dams at 14 wk after weaning (P<0.05). Blood glucose response was 46% higher at 23 wk after weaning (P<0.01), and systolic blood pressure was 16% higher at 28 wk after weaning (P<0.05). In conclusion, high multivitamin intake during pregnancy programmed the male offspring for the development of the components of metabolic syndrome in adulthood, possibly by its effects on central mechanisms of food intake control.

PMID:
18525008
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.90354.2008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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