Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008 Jul;27(7):640-5. doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e31816be008.

Clinical features of children infected with different strains of influenza B in southern Taiwan.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Research, National Health Research Institutes, Chunan, Miaoli, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study was designed to determine the clinical characteristics of children infected with different strains of influenza B viruses isolated in southern Taiwan. The clinical features were compared with influenza A infection occurring in the same period.

METHODS:

All children enrolled in the study had laboratory-confirmed infection with influenza A or B viruses. Influenza B speciation was performed by RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Demographic data, clinical findings, diagnoses, and outcomes were obtained.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 163 strains of influenza A and 118 strains of influenza B were isolated. The Yamagata-like strains were most prevalent in 2001. New reassortant strains were identified since 2002 and became predominant in 2005 and 2006. Children with influenza B were more likely than those with influenza A to be diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, myositis, and gastroenteritis (P < 0.05). Children infected with Yamagata-like strains were more likely to develop lower respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05) and accounted for all cases of invasive disease. Children infected with the Victoria-like group had the longest hospital stays associated with severe bacterial superinfection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Currently new reassortant influenza B viruses are the predominant strains circulating in southern Taiwan. There is considerable similarity of clinical features between influenza A and B in children. The Yamagata-like strains were associated with more invasive infections. Continuous influenza virus surveillance is essential particularly in Taiwan where pandemic strains tend to appear earlier than in other countries.

PMID:
18520968
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0b013e31816be008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - Ovid Insights
    Loading ...
    Support Center