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BMC Cancer. 2008 Jun 2;8:157. doi: 10.1186/1471-2407-8-157.

Case-control study of tobacco smoke exposure and breast cancer risk in Delaware.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention & Control, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute; Tampa, FL, USA. dana.rollison@moffitt.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tobacco smoke exposure may be associated with increased breast cancer risk, although the evidence supporting the association is inconclusive. We conducted a case-control study in Delaware, incorporating detailed exposure assessment for active and secondhand smoke at home and in the workplace.

METHODS:

Primary invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed among female Delaware residents, ages 40-79, in 2000-2002 were identified through the Delaware cancer registry (n = 287). Delaware drivers license and Health Care Finance Administration records were used to select age frequency-matched controls for women <65 and > or = 65, respectively. Detailed information on tobacco smoke exposure was obtained through telephone interviews.

RESULTS:

A statistically significant increased risk of breast cancer was observed for ever having smoked cigarettes (odds ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.99). However, there was no evidence of a dose-response relationship between breast cancer risk and total years smoked, cigarettes per day, or pack-years. Neither residential nor workplace secondhand smoke exposure was associated with breast cancer. Recalculations of active smoking risks using a purely unexposed reference group of women who were not exposed to active or secondhand smoking did not indicate increased risks of breast cancer.

CONCLUSION:

These findings do not support an association between smoking and breast cancer.

PMID:
18518960
PMCID:
PMC2424067
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2407-8-157
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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