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J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2008 Jul;45(1):70-80. doi: 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2008.04.007. Epub 2008 Apr 27.

Structural stability of neoangiogenic intramyocardial microvessels supports functional recovery in chronic ischemic myocardium.

Author information

1
Research and Development Unit, National Heart Center, Singapore. Winston_SHIM_SN@nhc.com.sg

Abstract

We hypothesize that combining angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) or ANG-2 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves myocardial perfusion and contractile function by modulating vascular adaptation of neoangiogenic microvessels in a chronic ischemic swine model. Four weeks after occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCx), animals were injected with AdVEGF(165) (n=6), AdVEGF(165)+AdANG-1 (n=6), AdVEGF(165)+AdANG-2 (n=6) or control vector (n=5) into the left ventricular posterolateral wall. Regional perfusion by fluorescent microspheres and segmental myocardial tissue velocity by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) were assessed at baseline, 4 weeks post occlusion and 4 weeks post therapy. Despite similar vascular growth following VEGF+ANG-1 and VEGF+ANG-2 treatments, transmural myocardial contractility improved only when VEGF was paired with ANG-1. In contrast, regional systolic function deteriorated uniformly across subepicardial, mid-myocardial and subendocardial segments in VEGF and VEGF+ANG-2 treated groups. Contractile improvement was associated with enhanced vascular stability through augmented arteriole formation, tight structural integration between VE-cadherin and beta-catenin at endothelial junctions and improved cross-talk between endothelium and myocardium. Structural stability of developing intramyocardial microvessels contributes to systolic function during ischemic neovascularization. Coordinated regulation of angiogenic revascularization that supports vascular stability is a key aspect in improving therapeutic outcomes in ischemic myocardium.

PMID:
18514708
DOI:
10.1016/j.yjmcc.2008.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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