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Stem Cells Dev. 2008 Jun;17(3):441-50. doi: 10.1089/scd.2007.0194.

Optimized lentiviral transduction of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

Author information

1
Gene Therapy Program, Department of Medicine, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much attention as potential platforms for transgene delivery and cell-based therapy for human disease. MSCs have the capability to self-renew and retain multipotency after extensive expansion in vitro, making them attractive targets for ex vivo modification and autologous transplantation. Viral vectors, including lentiviral vectors, provide an efficient means for transgene delivery into human MSCs. In contrast, mouse MSCs have proven more difficult to transduce with lentiviral vectors than their human counterparts, and because many studies use mouse models of human disease, an improved method of transduction would facilitate studies using ex vivo-modified mouse MSCs. We have worked toward improving the production of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors and optimizing transduction conditions for mouse MSCs using lentivirus vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G), the ecotropic murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein (MLV-E), and the glycoproteins derived from the Armstrong and WE strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-Arm, LCMV-WE). Mouse MSCs were readily transduced following overnight incubation using a multiplicity of infection of at least 40. Alternatively, mouse MSCs in suspension were readily transduced after a 1-h exposure to lentiviral pseudotypes immediately following trypsin treatment or retrieval from storage in liquid nitrogen. LCMV-WE pseudotypes resulted in efficient transduction of mouse MSCs with less toxicity than VSV-G pseudotypes. In conclusion, our improved production and transduction conditions for lentiviral vectors resulted in efficient transduction of mouse MSCs, and these improvements should facilitate the application of such cells in the context of mouse models of human disease.

PMID:
18513160
PMCID:
PMC2996877
DOI:
10.1089/scd.2007.0194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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