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Psychophysiology. 2008 Jul;45(4):671-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2008.00666.x. Epub 2008 May 20.

Interoceptive awareness in experienced meditators.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Graduate Program, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. sahib-khalsa@uiowa.edu

Abstract

Attention to internal body sensations is practiced in most meditation traditions. Many traditions state that this practice results in increased awareness of internal body sensations, but scientific studies evaluating this claim are lacking. We predicted that experienced meditators would display performance superior to that of nonmeditators on heartbeat detection, a standard noninvasive measure of resting interoceptive awareness. We compared two groups of meditators (Tibetan Buddhist and Kundalini) to an age- and body mass index-matched group of nonmeditators. Contrary to our prediction, we found no evidence that meditators were superior to nonmeditators in the heartbeat detection task, across several sessions and respiratory modulation conditions. Compared to nonmeditators, however, meditators consistently rated their interoceptive performance as superior and the difficulty of the task as easier. These results provide evidence against the notion that practicing attention to internal body sensations, a core feature of meditation, enhances the ability to sense the heartbeat at rest.

PMID:
18503485
PMCID:
PMC2637372
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-8986.2008.00666.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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