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Childs Nerv Syst. 2008 Sep;24(9):1005-12. doi: 10.1007/s00381-008-0618-4. Epub 2008 May 24.

Management of intracranial aneurysm in children: clipped and coiled.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 6 Tiantan Xili, Chongwen District, Beijing, 100050, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective was to describe the clinical features of intracranial aneurysm in children and evaluate the efficacy and safety of different treatment approaches for children with intracranial aneurysms.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Clinical data of 13 child patients with intracranial aneurysms that were diagnosed and treated in our hospital in the past 16 years were reviewed. Long-term follow-up data were also collected and reported.

RESULTS:

Direct surgical treatment was performed on eight out of all 13 patients; among them, seven achieved good recovery and one died. The remaining five patients were treated with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC). The aneurysm was successfully sealed off in one case and achieved good postoperative recovery. Residual aneurysm was detected in two cases; a second resection surgery was performed on one patient who died after the operation and on another with neck occlusion who recovered well. Two cases experienced aneurysm recanalization after interventional therapy; among them, one was treated with a second embolotherapy but had recanalization once again and was finally cured by aneurysm resection surgery.

CONCLUSION:

Aneurysmal surgery is proved to be a safe and effective treatment for children with intracranial aneurysm. Although requiring a long-term follow-up period to determine the clinical outcome, GDC is also shown to be safe for a child having acute bleeding. Once a residual aneurysm or recanalization occurs, microsurgery is recommended.

PMID:
18500529
PMCID:
PMC2515567
DOI:
10.1007/s00381-008-0618-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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