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J Nutr. 2008 Jun;138(6):1079-85.

The muscle protein synthetic response to carbohydrate and protein ingestion is not impaired in men with longstanding type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. r.manders@hb.unimaas.nl

Abstract

Protein ingestion stimulates muscle protein synthesis and improves net muscle protein balance. Insulin resistance has been suggested to result in a reduced muscle protein synthetic response to food intake. As such, we hypothesized that type 2 diabetes patients have a impaired muscle protein synthetic response to food ingestion. To test this hypothesis, 10 male type 2 diabetes patients using their normal oral glucose-lowering medication (68 +/- 2 y) and 10 matched, normoglycemic men (65 +/- 2 y) were randomly assigned to 2 crossover treatments in which whole body and muscle protein synthesis were measured following the consumption of either carbohydrate (CHO) or carbohydrate with a protein hydrolysate (CHO+PRO). Primed, continuous infusions with L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine were applied and blood and muscle samples were collected to assess whole-body protein balance and mixed muscle protein fractional synthetic rate over a 6-h period. Whole-body phenylalanine and tyrosine flux were higher after the CHO+PRO treatment compared with the CHO treatment in the diabetes and control group (P < 0.01). Protein balance was negative following CHO but positive following CHO+PRO treatment in both groups. Muscle protein synthesis rates were higher in both groups following the CHO+PRO (0.086 +/- 0.014%/h) treatment than in the CHO treatment (0.040 +/- 0.003%/h; P < 0.01) with no difference between the diabetes patients and normoglycemic controls. We conclude that the muscle protein synthetic response to CHO or CHO+PRO ingestion is not substantially impaired in longstanding, type 2 diabetes patients treated with oral blood glucose-lowering medication.

PMID:
18492837
DOI:
10.1093/jn/138.6.1079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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