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Nat Rev Neurosci. 2008 Jun;9(6):453-66. doi: 10.1038/nrn2401.

The neural control of micturition.

Author information

1
University College London, Department of Uro-Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, UK. c.fowler@ion.ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Micturition, or urination, occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. The neural circuitry that controls this process is complex and highly distributed: it involves pathways at many levels of the brain, the spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system and is mediated by multiple neurotransmitters. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary or reflex micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. This is a major health problem, especially in those with neurological impairment. Here we review the neural control of micturition and how disruption of this control leads to abnormal storage and release of urine.

PMID:
18490916
PMCID:
PMC2897743
DOI:
10.1038/nrn2401
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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