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Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008 Jun;56(4):210-3. doi: 10.1055/s-2007-989327.

Thoracic endoscopic surgery for hyperhidrosis: comparison of different techniques.

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  • 1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Gulhane Haydarpasa Military Academy of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hyperhidrosis is pathological perspiration in palmar, plantar or axillary surfaces. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is currently the most commonly used therapy for hyperhidrosis. Blockage of sympathetic ganglia is achieved by segmental resection, transection and/or cauterization, and clipping of the chain. We aimed to compare the efficacy of these methods with respect to patient satisfaction, recurrence of symptoms and complications.

METHODS:

Eighty male patients with a mean age of 22.02 +/- 2.61 years undergoing bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy or sympathetic blockage to treat primary hyperhidrosis were included in this randomized study. The patients were divided into four groups depending on the technique used for sympathetic blockage; techniques included resection (n = 20), transection (n = 20), ablation (n = 20), and clipping (n = 20).

RESULTS:

The primary success rate for isolated palmar hyperhidrosis was 96.3 %; for palmar and axillary hydrosis it was 95.7 % and for palmar and face/scalp hyperhidrosis it was 66.7 %. No recurrence was observed. The overall success rate of the operation was 95 % and the differences between the four groups were not statistically significant. In the clipping group, the duration of the surgical procedure was significantly shorter than in the other groups. Complication rates were similar among the groups. The postoperative chest roentgenogram revealed pneumothorax in nine patients, but none of them required intervention.

CONCLUSION:

Thoracic endoscopic sympathetic blockage yields similar results irrespective of the surgical technique adopted.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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