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Cancer Causes Control. 2008 Nov;19(9):895-907. doi: 10.1007/s10552-008-9163-4. Epub 2008 May 14.

A review of the relationship between tooth loss, periodontal disease, and cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge Building, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. mameyer@hsph.harvard.edu

Abstract

Recent studies have investigated the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and several systemic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and preterm birth. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, is highly prevalent in adult populations around the world, and may be preventable. Estimates of prevalence vary between races and geographic regions, with a marked increase in the occurrence of periodontal disease with advancing age. Worldwide estimates for the prevalence of severe periodontal disease generally range from 10 to 15%. The relationship between oral health and cancer has been examined for a number of specific cancer sites. Several studies have reported associations between periodontal disease or tooth loss and risk of oral, upper gastrointestinal, lung, and pancreatic cancer in different populations. In a number of studies, these associations persisted after adjustment for major risk factors, including cigarette smoking and socioeconomic status. This review provides a summary of these findings, discusses possible biological mechanisms involved, and raises methodological issues related to studying these relationships.

PMID:
18478344
PMCID:
PMC2723958
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-008-9163-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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