Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Genomics. 2008 May 12;9:214. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-9-214.

A universal DNA mini-barcode for biodiversity analysis.

Author information

1
Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada. imeus@uoguelph.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The goal of DNA barcoding is to develop a species-specific sequence library for all eukaryotes. A 650 bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) gene has been used successfully for species-level identification in several animal groups. It may be difficult in practice, however, to retrieve a 650 bp fragment from archival specimens, (because of DNA degradation) or from environmental samples (where universal primers are needed).

RESULTS:

We used a bioinformatics analysis using all CO1 barcode sequences from GenBank and calculated the probability of having species-specific barcodes for varied size fragments. This analysis established the potential of much smaller fragments, mini-barcodes, for identifying unknown specimens. We then developed a universal primer set for the amplification of mini-barcodes. We further successfully tested the utility of this primer set on a comprehensive set of taxa from all major eukaryotic groups as well as archival specimens.

CONCLUSION:

In this study we address the important issue of minimum amount of sequence information required for identifying species in DNA barcoding. We establish a novel approach based on a much shorter barcode sequence and demonstrate its effectiveness in archival specimens. This approach will significantly broaden the application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies.

PMID:
18474098
PMCID:
PMC2396642
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2164-9-214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center