Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Jun;15(6):584-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-1331.2008.02133.x.

Gelsolin concentration in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gelsolin is a highly conserved intracellular actin-binding protein with an extracellular isoform, plasma gelsolin, for which there is not yet a clearly defined function.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In this study, we determined gelsolin concentrations in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 25 subjects using immunoblotting and a functional assay that quantifies gelsolin's ability to accelerate actin polymerization.

RESULTS:

The gelsolin concentration in CSF, determined by quantitative immunoblotting was 1.2-15.9 microg/ml (average 5.9 +/- 3.8 mug/ml). In samples obtained from patients diagnosed with conditions that do not alter standard CSF clinical tests [(idiopathic cephalgia, ischialgia due to discopathy, and idiopathic (Bell's) facial nerve palsy or entrapment radial neuropathy)], the average gelsolin concentration was 7.2 +/- 4.3 microg/ml. In contrast, the gelsolin concentration in samples obtained from patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis was 2.1 +/- 0.7 microg/ml, and a similar low concentration was found in a patient recovering from a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The range of CSF gelsolin concentrations determined by the actin polymerization assay was 0.61-9.97 microg/ml (average 3.6 +/- 2.2 microg/ml). These lower values compared with those obtained from immunoblotting analysis suggest that CSF gelsolin may bind other CSF molecules leading to a reduction of its actin-binding activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results presented here show that CSF gelsolin concentration is significantly altered in certain neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, indicating the possible utility of CSF gelsolin levels for diagnostic purposes.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center