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Clin Neurophysiol. 2008 Jul;119(7):1590-9. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2008.03.010. Epub 2008 May 12.

Time of night and first night effects on arousal response in healthy adults.

Author information

1
Sleep Laboratory, Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Reims, France. esforza@chu-reims.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Several factors, such as homeostatic and circadian influences, may affect the density of cortical and subcortical arousals (AR). The purpose of this study was to examine the time-of-night and the first night effect on AR response.

METHODS:

AR were classified into microarousals (MA), phases of transitory activation (PAT), delta (D-burst) and K-complex burst (K-burst). The AR density and duration was analyzed during two consecutive nights with the analysis of sleep stage and sleep cycle in thirty-six healthy subjects.

RESULTS:

D- and K-burst showed a trend toward progressive decline across sleep cycles (p<0.0001). While MA rate was unaffected throughout sleep cycles, PAT index increased across the night (p=0.002). The density and duration of each group of AR exhibited reproducibility without significant differences between nights. An individual inter-night variability in AR density was found independently of night and sleep structure.

CONCLUSIONS:

While homeostatic and circadian influences affect nighttime subcortical and MA responses, a wakefulness drive modulates the occurrence of AR with movements. Although the pattern of AR responses was highly reliable from the first to second night, the substantial inter-individual variability suggests the existence of an individual susceptibility.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The first night effect on arousal response is affected by individual susceptibility and circadian and homeostatic influences.

PMID:
18468950
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2008.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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