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Arch Womens Ment Health. 2008 Jun;11(2):93-102. doi: 10.1007/s00737-008-0002-0. Epub 2008 May 8.

Mental health care preferences among low-income and minority women.

Author information

1
Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024-6505, USA. erum@ucla.edu

Abstract

Mental health care preferences are examined among 1,893 low-income immigrant and U.S.-born women with an acknowledged emotional problem (mean age = 29.1, SD = 89.6). Ethnicity, depression, somatization, and stigma are examined as they relate to mental health care preferences (medication, individual and group counseling, faith, family/friends). Seventy-eight percent of participants counseling would be helpful; 55%; group counseling; and 32% medication. Faith was cited by 81%; family and friends were endorsed by 65%. Minorities had lower odds than Whites of endorsing medication (Black immigrants: OR = 0.27, p < 0.001, U.S.-born Blacks: OR = 0.30, p < 0.001, immigrant Latinas: OR = 0.50, p < 0.01). Most minorities also had higher odds of endorsing faith compared to Whites (Black immigrants: OR = 3.62, p < 0.001; U.S.-born Blacks, OR = 3.85, p < 0.001; immigrant Latinas: OR = 9.76, p < 0.001). Being depressed was positively associated with endorsing medication (OR = 1.93, p < 0.001), individual counseling (OR = 2.66, p < 0.001), and group counseling (OR = 1.35, p < 0.01). Somatization was positively associated with endorsing medication (OR = 1.29, p < 0.05) and faith (OR = 1.37, p < 0.05). Stigma-concerns reduced the odds of endorsing group counseling (OR = 0.58, p < 0.001). Finally, being in mental health treatment was related to increased odds of endorsing medication (OR = 3.88, p < 0.001) and individual counseling (OR = 2.29, p = 0.001).

PMID:
18463940
PMCID:
PMC2689381
DOI:
10.1007/s00737-008-0002-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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