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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jul;93(7):2633-8. doi: 10.1210/jc.2007-2837. Epub 2008 May 6.

Absence of an acute insulin response predicts onset of type 2 diabetes in a Caucasian population with impaired glucose tolerance.

Author information

1
Department of General Practice, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam. g.nijpels@vumc.nl

Abstract

CONTEXT:

In persons with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), both impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance contribute to the conversion to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few studies have used criterion standard measures to asses the predictive value of impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance for the conversion to T2DM in a Caucasian IGT population.

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of the study was to determine the predictive value of measures of insulin secretion and insulin resistance derived from a hyperglycemic clamp, including the disposition index, for the development of T2DM in a Caucasian IGT population.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

The population-based Hoorn IGT study consisted of 101 Dutch IGT subjects (aged < 75 yr), with mean 2-h plasma glucose values, of two separate oral glucose tolerance tests, between 8.6 and 11.1 mmol/liter. A hyperglycemic clamp at baseline was performed to assess first-phase and second-phase insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. During follow-up, conversion to T2DM was assessed by means of 6-monthly fasting glucose levels and yearly oral glucose tolerance tests.

RESULTS:

The cumulative incidence of T2DM was 34.7%. Hazard ratio for T2DM development adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index was 5.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.60-12.67] for absence of first insulin peak, 1.58 (95% CI 0.60-4.17) for lowest vs. highest tertile of insulin sensitivity, and 1.78 (95% CI 0.65-4.88) for lowest vs. highest tertile of the disposition index.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these Caucasian persons with IGT, the absence of the first insulin peak was the strongest predictor of T2DM.

PMID:
18460558
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2007-2837
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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