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J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2008 Mar;18(3):158-62. doi: 03.2008/JCPSP.158162.

Predictors of intractable childhood epilepsy.

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1
Department of Paediatric Neurosciences, The Children's Hospital, Lahore. docmalikpk2000@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prognosis of seizures in epileptic children and identify early predictors of intractable childhood epilepsy.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case-control study.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

The Epilepsy Centre of the Children's Hospital Lahore, from February 2005 to April 2007.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

All children (aged 1 month to 16 years) with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy who were treated and followed at the centre during the study period were included. The patients who had marked seizures even after two years of adequate treatment were labeled as intractable epileptics (cases). Children who had no seizure for more than one year at last follow-up visit were the controls. Adequate treatment was described as using at least three anti-epileptic agents either alone or in combination with proper compliance and dosage. Records of these patients were reviewed to identify the variables that may be associated with seizure intractability.

RESULTS:

Of 442 epileptic children, 325 (74%) intractable and 117 (26%) control epileptics were included in the study. Male gender (OR=3.92), seizures onset in infancy (OR=5.27), = 10 seizures before starting treatment (OR=3.76), myoclonic seizures (OR=1.37), neonatal seizures (OR=3.69), abnormal EEG (OR=7.28) and cryptogenic epilepsy (OR=9.69) and head trauma (OR=4.07) were the factors associated with intractable epilepsy. Seizure onset between 5-7 years of age, idiopathic epilepsy, and absence seizures were associated with favourable prognosis in childhood epilepsy.

CONCLUSION:

Intractable childhood epilepsy is expected if certain risk factors such as type, age of onset, gender and cause of epilepsy are found. Early referral of such patients to the specialized centres is recommended for prompt and optimal management.

PMID:
18460244
DOI:
03.2008/JCPSP.158162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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