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J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Aug;23(8):1152-6. doi: 10.1007/s11606-008-0634-9. Epub 2008 May 6.

Screening male primary care patients for intimate partner violence perpetration.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. JaegerJ@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Primary prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV) at the level of the primary care provider is unexplored.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to identify whether men disclose current IPV perpetration when asked by a primary care provider.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Consecutive male patients of 6 providers in public health, university, and VA hospital clinics.

MEASUREMENTS:

Men were screened for IPV perpetration during routine visits, then given a Conflict Tactics Scale questionnaire (CTS2) to complete and mail back anonymously.

RESULTS:

One hundred twenty-eight men were screened; 46 (36%) returned CTS2 questionnaires. Twenty-three and 2 men disclosed past and current perpetration to providers, respectively. Providers assessed lethality/safety issues in 58% of those reporting a perpetration history (including both with current perpetration), responded with direct counseling to 63% (including both with current perpetration), and referred 17% for services related to the screening (including 1 with current perpetration). Nine and 26 men reported current, CTS2-assessed physical and psychological aggression of a partner, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Men appear to underreport current IPV perpetration in face-to-face primary care encounters when compared to other methods of reporting. Men may more readily report past IPV perpetration in face-to-face encounters.

PMID:
18459009
PMCID:
PMC2517980
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-008-0634-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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