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Gastroenterology. 2008 Jul;135(1):226-33. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2008.03.022. Epub 2008 Mar 29.

Human immunodeficiency virus-related microbial translocation and progression of hepatitis C.

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1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Viral Hepatitis Center, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection has been associated with enhanced microbial translocation, and microbial translocation is a mechanism through which alcohol and some enteric conditions cause liver disease. We hypothesized that HIV promotes liver disease by enhancing microbial translocation.

METHODS:

We studied human cohorts in which hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV outcomes were carefully characterized.

RESULTS:

HIV-related CD4(+) lymphocyte depletion was strongly associated with microbial translocation as indicated by elevated levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS-binding protein, soluble CD14, and fucose-binding lectin (AAL) reactive to immunoglobulin G specific for the alpha-galactose epitope and suppressed levels of endotoxin core antibodies (EndoCAb IgM) in HIV-infected subjects compared with the same persons before they had HIV infection and compared with HIV-uninfected subjects. The same measures of microbial translocation were strongly associated with HCV-related liver disease progression (cirrhosis), eg, LPS, odds ratio, 19.0 (P = .002); AAL, odds ratio, 27.8 (P < .0001); in addition, levels of LPS were elevated prior to recognition of cirrhosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Microbial translocation may be a fundamental mechanism through which HIV accelerates progression of chronic liver disease.

PMID:
18457674
PMCID:
PMC2644903
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2008.03.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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