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Yonsei Med J. 2008 Apr 30;49(2):204-10. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2008.49.2.204.

Comparison of remifentanil and fentanyl for postoperative pain control after abdominal hysterectomy.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In this randomized, double-blind study, we investigated the analgesic efficacy and side effects of continuous constant-dose infusions of remifentanil after total abdominal hysterectomy and compared it to fentanyl.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fifty-six adult female patients scheduled for elective total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups according to fentanyl (group F, n=28) or remifentanil (group R, n=28) for postoperative analgesia. Patients in group F were given fentanyl intravenously with an infusion rate of fentanyl 0.5 microg/kg/hr; group R was given remifentanil with an infusion rate of remifentanil 0.05 microg/kg/min for 2 days. Pain intensity at rest, occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness, pruritus, and respiratory depression were assessed 1 hr after arrival at the post-anesthesia care unit, at 6; 12; 24; and 48 hr post-operation and 6 hr post-infusion of the study drug. Pain was evaluated by using visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-10). The time that patients first requested analgesics was recorded as well as additional analgesics and antiemetics.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in VAS, time to first postoperative analgesics, and additional analgesics between the 2 groups. The incidences and severities of PONV and opioid related side effects were not different between the groups; however, there were 3 episodes (10.7%) of serious respiratory depression in group R.

CONCLUSION:

Continuous infusion technique of remifentanil did not reveal any benefits compared to fentanyl. Furthermore, it is not safe for postoperative analgesia in the general ward.

PMID:
18452255
PMCID:
PMC2615328
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2008.49.2.204
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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