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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Apr;100(4):343-50. doi: 10.1016/S1081-1206(10)60597-2.

Effect of sublingual immunotherapy with grass monomeric allergoid on allergen-specific T-cell proliferation and interleukin 10 production.

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1
Department of Biotechnology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. s.burastero@hsr.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is safe and efficacious in the treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis. Although favorable clinical effects have been observed with controlled trials as early as a few months since the beginning of treatment, few biological changes induced by SLIT have been demonstrated.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate in grass-allergic patients the effect of a 2-month SLIT regimen, administered with a simplified protocol without up-dosing, on proliferation and production of cytokines characteristic of the regulatory T-cell phenotype (interleukin 10 [IL-10] and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-beta]) by allergen-specific T cells.

METHODS:

Patients were recruited to the study in January 2006. SLIT was performed by self-administration and was continued for 60 days from February to April 2006. Eleven grass pollen-allergic patients with seasonal rhinitis were treated daily before the pollen season for 2 months with a modified allergen (monomeric allergoid) derived from a 3-grass pollen extract. Allergen-specific proliferation and production of IL-10 and TGF-beta were measured on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at baseline and treatment end. Tetanus toxoid served as the control antigen.

RESULTS:

After SLIT, allergen-specific (P = .002) but not tetanus toxoid-specific proliferation decreased, whereas IL-10 transcription increased (P < .001). TGB-beta transcription was also increased after treatment, although not statistically significantly (P = .06). Changes in proliferation to allergen and in IL-10 transcription were correlated (r = -0.82, P = .003).

CONCLUSIONS:

A short-term course of SLIT with modified allergen in grass-allergic patients is associated with the reduction of allergen-specific proliferation and with the up-regulation of the IL-10 regulatory cytokine.

PMID:
18450120
DOI:
10.1016/S1081-1206(10)60597-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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