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J Dent. 2008 Jul;36(7):481-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2008.03.005. Epub 2008 May 2.

Prevalence, intensity and nature of bacteraemia after toothbrushing.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Kings College London, Dental Institute, Bessemer Road, London SE5 9RS, UK. victoria.s.lucas@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the prevalence, intensity and microbial identity of bacteraemia associated with toothbrushing.

METHODS:

A total of 141 children and adolescents, aged between 3 and 17 years, having dental treatment under general anaesthesia at the Eastman Dental Hospital were recruited. Six millilitre of blood was taken before toothbrushing (baseline) with (1) Oral B 30 toothbrush or (2) Braun or (3) Sonicare electric toothbrush or (4) dental handpiece and rubber cup. A second 6-ml sample was taken 30s after toothbrushing. All blood samples were processed using lysis filtration and bacteria were identified to species level.

RESULTS:

There was a significantly greater prevalence of bacteraemia following the dental handpiece only (p=0.02). There was a significantly greater aerobic and anaerobic intensity of bacteraemia following brushing with both the Sonicare (p=0.03 and p=0.05) and the dental handpiece (p=0.001 and p=0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

Toothbrushing causes a bacteraemia that is often statistically significantly greater than baseline. Toothbrushing is an important contributory factor in cumulative dental bacteraemia.

PMID:
18448227
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2008.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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