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PLoS One. 2008 Apr 30;3(4):e2044. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002044.

Dental microwear and diet of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei.

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1
Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America. pungar@uark.edu

Erratum in

  • PLoS ONE. 2008;3(5). doi: 10.1371/annotation/195120f0-18ee-4730-9bd6-0d6effd68fcf.

Abstract

The Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei had enormous, flat, thickly enameled cheek teeth, a robust cranium and mandible, and inferred massive, powerful chewing muscles. This specialized morphology, which earned P. boisei the nickname "Nutcracker Man", suggests that this hominin could have consumed very mechanically challenging foods. It has been recently argued, however, that specialized hominin morphology may indicate adaptations for the consumption of occasional fallback foods rather than preferred resources. Dental microwear offers a potential means by which to test this hypothesis in that it reflects actual use rather than genetic adaptation. High microwear surface texture complexity and anisotropy in extant primates can be associated with the consumption of exceptionally hard and tough foods respectively. Here we present the first quantitative analysis of dental microwear for P. boisei. Seven specimens examined preserved unobscured antemortem molar microwear. These all show relatively low complexity and anisotropy values. This suggests that none of the individuals consumed especially hard or tough foods in the days before they died. The apparent discrepancy between microwear and functional anatomy is consistent with the idea that P. boisei presents a hominin example of Liem's Paradox, wherein a highly derived morphology need not reflect a specialized diet.

PMID:
18446200
PMCID:
PMC2315797
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0002044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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