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Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2008 Jun;150(2):233-9. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpb.2008.03.007. Epub 2008 Mar 21.

A putative protein structurally related to zygote arrest 1 (Zar1), Zar1-like, is encoded by a novel gene conserved in the vertebrate lineage.

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  • 1Department of Animal Pathology, Hygiene and Public Veterinary Health, Section of Biochemistry and Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Identification and characterization of a bovine cDNA and the corresponding gene coding for a novel protein structurally related to Zar1, therefore called Zar1-like, are here reported for the first time. Structure of Zar1-like is similar to Zar1 gene, nevertheless they are located on distinct chromosomes. We demonstrated that the new gene as well as its genomic context are conserved along the whole vertebrate lineage. Analysis of the deduced protein primary structure showed a high conservation, among vertebrates, of the C-terminal region, where the putative presence of both zinc finger motifs and classical nuclear localization signals is also shared with Zar1. Bovine Zar1-like and the only two other available mRNA leader sequences (human and chicken) exhibit a number of upstream AUGs, suggesting that they are likely to be regulated at translational level. Expression patterns of the cattle transcripts show that Zar1-like is absent in early stages of embryo development, whereas Zar1 is expressed in matured oocytes and in in vitro produced pre-implantation embryos. In adult tissues Zar1-like transcript expression appears to be less restricted than Zar1, nevertheless, at least in bovine, both mRNAs are co-expressed in gonads, raising the question of a possible functional link.

PMID:
18442940
DOI:
10.1016/j.cbpb.2008.03.007
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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