Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Toxicol Pathol. 2008 Apr;36(3):388-96. doi: 10.1177/0192623308315829. Epub 2008 Apr 25.

Spontaneous occurrence of a distinctive renal tubule tumor phenotype in rat carcinogenicity studies conducted by the national toxicology program.

Author information

1
Private Consultant, Tairua, New Zealand. gordonhard@msn.com

Abstract

The Toxicology Data Management System (TDMS) of the National Toxicology Program, National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, was surveyed for occurrence and distribution of a distinctive renal tubule tumor type in rats. The hallmark features of this tumor included eosinophilic/amphophilic staining, large finely granular cells, and numerous vacuoles and/or minilumens. It is referred to here as the amphophilic-vacuolar (AV) variant of renal tubule tumor. Of 154 studies in which renal tubule tumors had been recorded in the standard single sections of kidney in the TDMS, there were collectively 1012 rats with renal adenomas, carcinomas, or adenocarcinomas, and of these, 100 displayed the distinctive AV morphology, representing 74 studies involving mostly the F344 rat, but also the Sprague-Dawley and Wistar strains. The AV tumors (mainly adenomas but also some carcinomas) occurred usually as solitary lesions in the affected animals. However, they were multiple and bilateral in a few cases. They were equally distributed between the sexes, did not metastasize (at least to the lung), and were not associated with chronic progressive nephropathy. The distribution of this renal tumor type was random across studies and dose groups, underscoring the likelihood that it was of spontaneous origin and not chemically induced. Accordingly, it is suggested that this distinctive renal tumor phenotype be recorded as a separate category from conventional RTT when assessing the carcinogenic potential of a test compound.

PMID:
18441261
PMCID:
PMC2905801
DOI:
10.1177/0192623308315829
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center