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Ophthalmology. 2008 Oct;115(10):1805-8, 1808.e1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2008.03.006. Epub 2008 Apr 28.

Neurodevelopment in children with albinism.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate neurologic development in children with albinism.

DESIGN:

Observational cohort series.

PARTICIPANTS AND/OR CONTROLS:

Seventy-eight children with albinism, ages 4 to 18 years.

METHODS:

Parents completed a developmental questionnaire and were interviewed to evaluate their child for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) utilizing Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criteria. Sixty-five children underwent neurologic evaluation of balance and fine and gross motor movements. Results were compared with age-appropriate norms. Standardized reading tests were administered to 44 children. Each of 7 neurodevelopmental parameters were compared in terms of binocular best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Seven neurodevelopmental parameters were measured, including onset of walking, tandem gait, repetitive finger movements, sequential finger movements, standing on one foot, hopping on one foot, and throwing a ball overhand. School performance, reading performance, and presence of ADHD were also measured.

RESULTS:

The BCVA ranged from 20/20 to 20/800, with median of 20/150. A diagnosis of ADHD was present in 21.8% and pervasive developmental disorder was noted in three children (3.8%). No significant developmental delays were noted in the majority of children. Motor development was generally within the normal range and unaffected by severity of visual impairment. Parents reported that 82% performed at grade level in math and 74% at grade level in reading. Only 18% scored below average on standardized reading tests.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most children with albinism have normal neurologic development despite visual impairment and increased prevalence of ADHD.

PMID:
18440642
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2008.03.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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