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Clin J Pain. 2008 May;24(4):325-34. doi: 10.1097/AJP.0b013e31816216a9.

The restore rechargeable, implantable neurostimulator: handling and clinical results of a multicenter study.

Author information

  • 1AZ Nikolaas-Campus SM, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium. jeanpierre.vanbuyten@mariamiddelares.be

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Spinal cord stimulation is an effective therapy for chronic, neuropathic pain refractory to medication. Use of a rechargeable neurostimulation system (Restore, Medtronic Inc) could provide greater longevity in the treatment of complex pain. However, patients' ability to successfully recharge a neurostimulation system has not yet been demonstrated.

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Ability of patients to recharge the neurostimulator.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:

Patient and physician satisfaction with the system, pain relief, quality of life, functional status, adverse events.

METHODS:

Prospective, open-label, multicenter, European study in patients with long-term refractory neuropathic pain. Recharging ability was assessed 1-month postimplant. Patient and physician satisfaction, pain relief, quality of life, and functional status were assessed at scheduled follow-up visits through 12 months. Adverse events were monitored throughout.

RESULTS:

Primary end point: 100% of patients (n=41) successfully recharged the neurostimulator. Secondary end points at 1 month: 78.6% of patients found recharging easy. At 12 months: physicians were satisfied with the system for 92.7% of patients; pain intensity decreased significantly (P<0.001); mean self-reported pain relief was 62%; 80.5% of patients had more than 50% pain relief; quality of life and functional status improved significantly (P<0.001); 98% of patients would recommend spinal cord stimulation to others. Overall, 41 device-related complications (23 patients) were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Twelve-month experience indicates that the rechargeable neurostimulation system (Restore) was easy to use, with 100% of patients able to recharge successfully. Patient and physician satisfaction was high, with significant improvements in pain, quality of life, and functional status. Complications were comparable to prior experience with this therapy.

PMID:
18427231
DOI:
10.1097/AJP.0b013e31816216a9
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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