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Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008 Apr;14(2):109-17. doi: 10.1037/1099-9809.14.2.109.

Mothers' and fathers' involvement with school-age children's care and academic activities in Navajo Indian families.

Author information

1
Department of Individual, Family and Community Education, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. zhossain@unm.edu

Abstract

This exploratory study examined mothers' and fathers' reports of time involvement in their school-age children's care and academic activities. The study also explored the relationship between parents' socioeconomic status (SES) variables (age, education, income, work hours, and length of marriage) and their relative involvement with children. Mother and father dyads from 34 two-parent Navajo (Diné) Indian families with a second- or third-grade child participated in the study. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed that mothers invested significantly more time in children's care on demand and academic activities than fathers, but the differences in maternal and paternal perceptions of time involvement in routine care were not significant. The gender of the child did not influence the amount of time parents invested in children's care and academic activities. Mothers' involvement with children was not related to any of the SES variables. Fathers' involvement was significantly associated with work hours and length of marriage, and work hours produced significant interaction with fathers' involvement with children. Findings are discussed in light of gender role differences in parental involvement with children within Navajo families.

PMID:
18426283
DOI:
10.1037/1099-9809.14.2.109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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