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Clin Exp Hypertens. 2008 Apr;30(3):233-41. doi: 10.1080/10641960802068725.

Influence of mental stress on the plasma homocysteine level and blood pressure change in young men.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to determine whether mental stress influences the plasma total homocysteine level or blood pressure in young men.

METHOD:

Twenty-seven male university students were assigned to a normal blood pressure group (24-h systolic blood pressure <125 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure <75 mmHg; 13 subjects) or a high blood pressure group (24-h systolic blood pressure > or =125 mmHg, or 24-h diastolic blood pressure > or =75 mmHg; 14 subjects). Wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device, subjects rested for 30 minutes, underwent an arithmetic test for 15 minutes, and rested again for 15 minutes. Blood samples were taken before and after the test. Plasma total homocysteine levels were measured. Heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathovagal balance were determined during the test.

RESULTS:

The mean total homocysteine level at rest in the high blood pressure group was slightly, but not significantly, higher than that in the normal blood pressure group. The resting total homocysteine level was significantly higher in subjects with parental history of hypertension than in those without (p < 0.01). Blood pressure, heart rate, and the plasma total homocysteine level were increased significantly by mental stress (p < 0.05). The change in total homocysteine correlated significantly with the changes in systolic blood pressure and sympathovagal balance (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Resting total homocysteine level was significantly higher in male students with a parental history of hypertension than in those without. It was shown that mental stress elevates heart rate, blood pressure, sympathovagal activity, and the plasma total homocysteine level in young men.

PMID:
18425703
DOI:
10.1080/10641960802068725
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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