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Diabetes Care. 2008 Jul;31(7):1445-7. doi: 10.2337/dc08-0116. Epub 2008 Apr 16.

Hyperinsulinemia in African-American adolescents compared with their American white peers despite similar insulin sensitivity: a reflection of upregulated beta-cell function?

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. tamara.hannon@chp.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

African-American (AA) children are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant compared with American white (AW) children. Previously, we demonstrated that insulin secretion relative to insulin sensitivity was approximately 75% higher in AA compared with AW children, suggesting that hyperinsulinemia in AA children is not merely a compensatory response to lower insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present investigation was to assess whether glucose-stimulated insulin response is higher in AA versus AW adolescents who have comparable in vivo insulin sensitivity.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamp techniques were utilized to assess first- and second-phase insulin secretion. Insulin secretion relative to insulin sensitivity was calculated as the glucose disposition index.

RESULTS:

AA adolescents compared with their AW peers with comparable insulin sensitivity and body composition had higher first-phase insulin concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS:

The quantitative relationship between insulin sensitivity and first-phase insulin appears to differ among AA and AW adolescents.

PMID:
18417751
PMCID:
PMC2453672
DOI:
10.2337/dc08-0116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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