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BMC Public Health. 2008 Apr 15;8:121. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-121.

Reliability of medical students' vaccination histories for immunisable diseases.

Author information

1
Occupational Health Service, Hospital of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany. Sabine.Wicker@kgu.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Medical students come into contact with infectious diseases early on their career. Immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases is therefore vital for both medical students and the patients with whom they come into contact.

METHODS:

The purpose of this study was to compare the medical history and serological status of selected vaccine-preventable diseases of medical students in Germany.

RESULTS:

The overall correlation between self-reported medical history statements and serological findings among the 150 students studied was 86.7 %, 66.7 %, 78 % and 93.3 % for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella, conditional on sufficient immunity being achieved after one vaccination. Although 81.2 % of the students' medical history data correlated with serological findings, significant gaps in immunity were found.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate that medical history alone is not a reliable screening tool for immunity against the vaccine-preventable diseases studied.

PMID:
18412957
PMCID:
PMC2330143
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-8-121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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