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J Proteome Res. 2008 May;7(5):1904-15. doi: 10.1021/pr700651b. Epub 2008 Apr 15.

Quantitative analysis of surface plasma membrane proteins of primary and metastatic melanoma cells.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403, USA.

Abstract

Plasma membrane proteins play critical roles in cell-to-cell recognition, signal transduction and material transport. Because of their accessibility, membrane proteins constitute the major targets for protein-based drugs. Here, we described an approach, which included stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), cell surface biotinylation, affinity peptide purification and LC-MS/MS for the identification and quantification of cell surface membrane proteins. We applied the strategy for the quantitative analysis of membrane proteins expressed by a pair of human melanoma cell lines, WM-115 and WM-266-4, which were derived initially from the primary and metastatic tumor sites of the same individual. We were able to identify more than 100 membrane and membrane-associated proteins from these two cell lines, including cell surface histones. We further confirmed the surface localization of histone H2B and three other proteins by immunocytochemical analysis with confocal microscopy. The contamination from cytoplasmic and other nonmembrane-related sources is greatly reduced by using cell surface biotinylation and affinity purification of biotinylated peptides. We also quantified the relative expression of 62 identified proteins in the two types of melanoma cells. The application to quantitative analysis of membrane proteins of primary and metastatic melanoma cells revealed great potential of the method in the comprehensive identification of tumor progression markers as well as in the discovery of new protein-based therapeutic targets.

PMID:
18410138
PMCID:
PMC4704867
DOI:
10.1021/pr700651b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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