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Am J Surg Pathol. 2008 Jun;32(6):844-50. doi: 10.1097/PAS.0b013e31815b121c.

Alterations in the immunohistochemical expression of Das-1 and CG-3 in colonic mucosal biopsy specimens helps distinguish ulcerative colitis from Crohn disease and from other forms of colitis.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA.rhy2001@med.cornell.edu

Abstract

Distinction between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease (CD) in mucosal biopsies is often difficult. Das-1 and CG-3 are monoclonal antibodies directed against an unknown colonic epithelial protein and human tropomyosin isoform-5, respectively, both show altered expression in patients with UC. In this study, we evaluated the utility of Das-1 and CG-3 in distinguishing UC from CD and from other types of colitis. One colonic biopsy specimen from each of 85 patients with confirmed UC (n=25), CD (n=15), lymphocytic (n=15), collagenous (n=15), and ischemic (n=15) colitis, and also 10 samples from normal controls, were stained for Das-1 and CG-3 using standard techniques. Reactivity for Das-1 and CG-3 was noted to be absent or present, and the location (ie, surface+/-crypt epithelium) and degree (weak or strong) of CG-3 staining was recorded. Loss of Das-1 staining occurred more frequently in UC (96%) compared with CD (20%), lymphocytic (20%), collagenous (13%), and ischemic colitis (0%) cases, as well as controls (10%, P<0.001 for all comparisons). CG-3 positivity in crypt epithelium was significantly more common in UC (52%) compared with the other groups (P< or =0.02 for all comparisons). The combination of strong crypt CG-3 staining and loss of Das-1 staining was noted in 44% of UC cases, but not in any other type of colitis (P=0.003 for all comparisons). We conclude that the patterns of Das-1 and CG-3 staining in colonic mucosal biopsies may be clinically useful in distinguishing UC from CD and from other colitidies.

PMID:
18408596
DOI:
10.1097/PAS.0b013e31815b121c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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