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J Magn Reson Imaging. 2008 May;27(5):1077-82. doi: 10.1002/jmri.21331.

A clinical comparison of rigid and inflatable endorectal-coil probes for MRI and 3D MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the prostate.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94107, USA. sue@radiology.ucsf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the data quality and ease of use of four endorectal-coil probe setups for prostate MRI.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Four endorectal-coil probe setups were compared: 1) air-inflated probe; 2) perfluorocarbon (PFC)-inflated probe; 3) rigid, smaller prototype coil; and 4) rigid, smaller coil designed for biopsying the prostate. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), positioning, shimming, MRI motion artifact, and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) spectral quality were assessed.

RESULTS:

Rigid coils provided approximately 2.5-fold higher SNR than inflatable coils near the peripheral zone midline. The biopsy probe sensitivity decreased dramatically by the apex. The rigid probes, as compared to the inflatable probes, took longer to place (10 +/- 2 vs. 7 +/- 2 minutes, P < 0.0002), tended to be placed too superiorly, required repositioning more often (73% vs. 20%, P < 0.003), and had higher motion artifacts (P < 0.001). Shimming time was least for the PFC-inflated probe (2 +/- 0.5 minutes, P < 0.05). The air-inflated probe produced larger linewidths (P < 0.01) and tended to have longer shim times (7 +/- 4 minutes) and poorer spectral quality.

CONCLUSION:

The inflatable coil is a good clinical choice due to ease of use, good coverage, and low motion artifacts. PFC-inflation is recommended as it provided higher quality data than air-inflation. The rigid, smaller probes have higher SNR and produce less tissue distortion and may be preferred for certain applications.

PMID:
18407539
PMCID:
PMC2832222
DOI:
10.1002/jmri.21331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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